My sibo journey update with a chicken soup recipe chucked in!


This week I started the long journey to heal my SIBO. I had an appointment with my consultant and he’s started me on Rifaximin, a specialised antibiotic that works solely in the gut. He’s also chucked in some potent vitamins and a very strict version of the low fodmap diet. After just a few days I’m already feeling much better. Here’s to hoping that it’s not a placebo effect!

I’m nervous that this dose is only for two weeks and that it might not fully heal me, in fact I’m expecting it not to. I know how long this journey can be, I’ve been on it for years already.

He also thinks I have delayed gastric emptying otherwise known as gastroparesis. This is where my diabetes has damaged and paralysed the nerves in my stomach to the extent that doing its job is becoming difficult. This would explain a lot of my symptoms but is just another diagnosis I don’t want…

Having answers is always helpful though, so I’ll willingly go through the cameras and x-rays if it means I can get my life back.

After the week I’d had, this weekend I just tucked myself away in bed and let myself rest. I really needed it. I also made some nourishing chicken soup using the leftovers from a roast chicken. It was easy on the tummy, tasted good and soothed me, so I thought I’d share it with you too!

 

Ingredients

  • Chicken, either left over from your roast, or fresh will do, diced or shredded
  • 3 carrots, diced
  • ½ swede, diced
  • 1 courgette, diced
  • 3 parsnips, diced
  • ½ celeriac, diced
  • The green tops of 6 spring onions
  • ½ tbsp. Garlic infused oil
  • 1 tbsp thyme
  • 1 tbsp fresh chives
  • 1 tbsp fresh parsley
  • 1 tsp yeast extract
  • Low fodmap stock cubes
  • Salt and pepper, to taste

 

Method

Throw all of the veg and chicken into a deep pan and drizzle over the garlic infused oil. Let is simmer gently whilst you boil the kettle.

Pour enough hot water over the veg until it’s completely covered and mix in the rest of the ingredients, except for the fresh herbs.

Let is simmer gently for up to 1 hour. Once the veg is soft, season and throw in all of the fresh herbs.

Enjoy!

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Quick and easy low fodmap tomato/marinara sauce


A basic tomato sauce is the base to so many meals. But it’s usually full of delicious, delicious, tummy ache inducing onions and garlic.

A staple of mine and Steve’s weekly dinners for when we’re tired or in a rush is simple pasta, passata, cheese and salt and pepper. So simple but it tastes so good! You can really taste the tomatoes.

I’ve taken that recipe and played around with it a bit to make a sauce that tastes like good, old fashioned marinara sauce. You can use it on pizza, pasta or whatever you want. It’s such a staple sauce it would be a shame for us fodmappers to miss out.

Ingredients

  • 500g Passata
  • 2 tsp dried basil
  • 2 tsp dried oregano
  • 2 tsp garlic infused oil
  • 1 low fodmap stock cube (these cubes are great)
  • 1 tsp low fodmap yeast extract (most own brand supermarket versions are fine but check the label)
  • Salt and pepper, to taste
  • A pinch of sugar

 

Method

Heat up the passata in a saucepan then add all of the ingredients. Feel free to add a splash of water depending on how thick/thin you want the sauce.

Simmer for 10 minutes and you’re good to go!

I like to mix in fresh basil too if I have some.

Low fodmap, autumnal sausage casserole


It’s finally autumn and I’m so happy! I’ve been waiting for that crisp breeze, those crunchy leaves, enormous scarves and most of all… the food!

You can’t eat stew in the summer, it warms you up too much. But as soon as September hits I’m ready. Yummy root veg and tasty meat in a good gravy AND it’s nutritious and full of vitamins, it’s a real winner for me!

It’s so easy to make and you can change it up with what meat you use and whatever veg you have in the fridge!

Enjoy!

Ingredients

  •  6 low fodmap sausages (these sausages are excellent and low fodmap)
  • 2 spring onions (green tops only)
  • 1/2 medium swede
  • 3 parsnips
  • 3 carrots
  • 3 medium potatoes
  • Enough low fodmap stock to cover the stew – I’ve just discovered these low fodmap stock cubes which are great!
  • 1 glass of red wine (optional)
  • 1 tbsp tomato puree
  • Salt and pepper to taste

 

Method

Brown the sausages in a pan, then remove and slice into chunks. We’re only browning them here so there’s no need for them to be cooked through as they will be cooked in the stew.

Peel and chop up all of the veg and finely slice the spring onion.

Tip the veg and sausages into a deep, large pan or slow cooker and pour in the rest of the ingredients.

If using a pan, simmer on a low heat for 1-1 ½ hours or until the veg is soft.

If using a slow cooker, leave for 3 to four hours.

Enjoy!

Low fodmap lamb tagine

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A warming, delicately spiced, melt in your mouth tagine is a wonderful thing. I discovered my love for this tasty dish at one of my best friend’s wedding, where they served steaming bowls of delicious tagine packed full of flavour to us hungry guests! It’s such a crowd pleaser!

And just because you’re on low fodmap doesn’t mean you should have to miss out. But if you’re on this diet then you’re probably dealing with some pretty horrible symptoms and the thought of slaving over a hot oven after a long day is not a happy one…

And this is where the magic of a slow cooker comes in. An authentic Moroccan tagine is made in a proper tagine pot but when energy is in short supply a slow cooker is your best friend. You can chuck everything in at once and just leave it to do all the work.

I also like to pack it full of veg to get as many nutrients in as possible.

Although tagine is usually bursting full of glistening, plump apricots and sultanas, they’re high in fodmaps so I’ve sadly had to leave them out of this recipe but I think the spices more than make up for that.

Enjoy!

Ingredients

  • 1 tsp cayenne pepper
  • 2 tsp ground black pepper
  • 1½ tbsp paprika
  • 1½ tbsp ground ginger
  • 1 tbsp turmeric
  • 1 tsp ground cinnamon
  • 500g lamb, diced
  • 2 carrots, peeled and chopped
  • A handful of olives
  • ½ butternut squash, peeled andchopped
  • 1 red pepper, chopped
  • 1 courgette, chopped
  • 2 tbsp olive oil
  • 1 tbsp garlic oil
  • 700g passata
  • 1 tsp saffron stamens, soaked in cold water
  • 600ml/1 pint low fodmap stock
  • 1 tbsp clear maple syrup
  • 2 tbsp coriander, roughly chopped
  • 2 tbsp flat leaf parsley, roughly chopped

Method

  1. Place the cayenne, black pepper, paprika, ginger, turmeric and cinnamon into a small bowl and mix to combine. Place the lamb in a large bowl and toss together with half of the spice mix. Cover and leave overnight in the fridge. You can skip this stage and just put all of it in the slow cooker at once if you’re short on time or energy!
  2. Heat 1 tbsp olive oil and 1 tbsp of garlic oil in a large casserole dish. Add the veg and the remaining spice mix and cook over a gentle heat for 10 minutes so that the veg is soft.
  3. In a separate frying pan, heat the remaining oil and brown the cubes of lamb on all sides then add the browned meat to the slow cooker. De-glaze the frying pan with a glug of passata and add these juices to the pan.
  4. Tip everything, including the remaining ingredients into your slow cooker and let it cook for at least 2 hours, until the lamb is meltingly tender.

Enjoy!

Low fodmap yummy shepherd’s pie


Low fodmap cooking can be a pain. So many ingredients we can’t have and flavour quickly can become a thing of the past…

But it doesn’t have to be! 

A few little substitutions here and there and using different types of veg to add extra flavour can turn bland and boring into a big bowl of tasty!

One of those recipes that can easily become low fodmap is shepherd’s pie. I love shepherd’s pie. It’s proper comfort food. And I promise you, the low fodmap version will taste just as good as the onion, lactose, wheat laced tummy ache that shepherds pie usually is.

It might not be a traditional recipe but I promise you it will hit the spot!

Ingredients

  • 500g mince (lamb, beef or pork all work well here)
  • 2 large carrots, peeled and diced
  • Half a swede, peeled and diced
  • 2 parsnips, peeled and diced
  • 1 tbsp garlic infused oil
  • 2 red peppers, diced
  • 1 small glass of red wine (optional)
  • 2 tbsp tomato puree
  • ½ tbsp. dried oregano
  • ½ tbsp. dried basil
  • Low fodmap stock
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  • 1 tbsp cornflour to thicken

For the mash topping:

  • 1kg potatoes
  • Olive oil
  • 100g lactose free cream cheese
  • 1 tsp mustard
  • Salt and pepper to taste

Method

  1. For the mince base, start off by browning the mince in a deep casserole pan. Then add in all of the veg and the garlic oil and fry gently until they start to soften, this should take about 5 minutes.
  2. Then pour over the red wine and leave it to simmer for 5 minutes to cook off the alcohol.
  3. Tip in the rest of the ingredients and then simmer until everything is soft and cooked.
  4. I like to thicken the mix a bit to stop the mashed potato from sinking, so I mix a little cornflour with some water and stir in to the mince whilst it’s still hot. You can add more or less depending on how thick you like it.
  5. For the mashed potato, peel and slice the potatoes thinly. Slicing them thinly will mean they cook faster and you’re less likely to get lumps. Boil the potatoes in water until soft then drain. I like to put my potatoes into my food mixer to really get them fluffy but you can mash by hand or however you like. As you mash, pour in the oil 1 tbsp at a time until it’s the right consistency. Then add in the lactose free cream cheese and the mustard and beat the mixture until fluffy. Season with salt and pepper.
  6. In a deep oven dish, pour in the mince mixture, then top with the potatoes. If you can tolerate cheddar, you can sprinkle a little on top.
  7. Bake in the oven until the top is brown and it’s piping hot inside (usually around 30-40 minutes).

I like to serve it with some green veg and some gravy on top (see my recipe for gravy below).Enjoy!

 

Low fodmap minestrone soup


I’ve always loved a good chunky vegetable broth. It’s so comforting and packed full of goodness . My Baba (Ukrainian grandmother) makes the BEST vegetable and noodle soup! It’s like medicine for the soul.

Minestrone soup makes me feel the same way. So much love, attention and honest, simple ingredients go into making it. There are so many different ways of making it and hundreds of different family recipes but this recipe is my way. 

Ingredients

  • 500g Passata
  • 1 tbsp tomato purée
  • 1 tbsp Garlic infused oil
  • Half a swede
  • 3 carrots
  • 150g gluten free pasta
  • 2 courgettes
  • 2 red peppers
  • 1/2 tbsp dried basil 
  • 1/2 tbsp oregano
  • 1/2 tbsp smoked paprika
  • 100ml white wine
  • Low fodmap stock – enough to cover
  • 1 tsp sugar
  • 3 tsp cornflour 
  • 3 leaves of spring greens
  • Fresh basil (optional)

Method

  1. Dice all of the veg and throw them into a deep casserole dish or saucepan.
  2. Tip in all of the other ingredients except for the pasta and the cornflour. Pour over enough stock to cover everything.
  3. Simmer until the veg is soft then tip in the pasta.
  4. Once the pasta is cooked, mix the cornflour with a splash of water then slowly pour into the soup whilst stirring continuously.
  5. Check the seasoning and mix in some salt and pepper if you fancy it! 

Enjoy! It’s great to take as a packed lunch to reheat at work and will last up to 5 days in the fridge! 

Low fodmap creamy mushroom risotto


I LOVE risotto. That creamy, comforting, steaming bowl of yum that fills you up just right.

Making a beautiful risotto is so easy but filled with cream, garlic and onion it’s definitely not low fodmap.

Well I’ve come up with a recipe that’s both low fodmap and still tastes like that gooey, ricey goodness that we all love! Enjoy!


Ingredients

  • 2 tbsp garlic infused oil
  • The green tops of 6 spring onions
  • 400g Arborio rice
  • 1.1 litres of low fodmap stock (see previous post on stock)
  • 2 glasses of white wine
  • 30g dried porcini mushrooms (porcini mushrooms are low fodmap in small servings so 15g per person or less will be safe)
  • 90g Parmesan
  • Butter
  • Salt and pepper
  • A handful of fresh parsely

Serves 6

Method

  1. Prepare porcini mushrooms: Place dried porcini mushrooms in a bowl with 1 cup boiling water. Weight down the mushrooms with something so they stay submerged for 30 minutes. After 30 minutes, squeeze mushrooms (saving all liquid) and chop porcini mushrooms coarsely.
  1. Heat the stock and mix with the mushroom liquid. Finely chop the spring onion ends. Finely grate the Parmesan.
  2. In a separate pan, heat the garlic infused oil and 1 small knob of butter over a low heat. (Usually you would fry the onions and garlic here but the spring onions ends will burn too quickly so I just add them in with the rice.)
  3. Add the rice and spring onions and turn up the heat – the rice will now begin to lightly fry, so keep stirring it. After 1 minute it will look slightly translucent. Add the wine and keep stirring.
  4. Once the wine has cooked into the rice, add your first ladle of hot stock along with the mushrooms and a good pinch of sea salt. Turn the heat down to a simmer so the rice doesn’t cook too quickly on the outside.
  5. Keep adding ladlefuls of stock, stirring, allowing each ladleful to be absorbed before adding the next. This will take around 15 minutes. Carry on adding stock until the rice is soft but with a slight bite. Don’t forget to check the seasoning carefully. If you run out of stock before the rice is cooked, add some boiling water.
  6. Remove the pan from the heat, add 1 knob of butter, the parsley and the Parmesan, then stir well.
  7. Place a lid on the pan and allow to sit for 2 minutes – this is the most important part of making the perfect risotto, as this is when it becomes creamy and oozy like it should be. Serve. This also makes a great leftover lunch!